Keeping stories close to home

Image via wikipedia

Sorry for the long absence!  End of school stuff, business trip, blah, blah, blah.  Ready for summer to begin!  So here is a bit about the author of our most recent book.

Christopher Paul Curtis was born and raised in Flint, Michigan – which, probably not so coincidentally – is the setting of our book, The Watsons Go to Birmingham: 1963.   And interestingly enough, his age just about matches that of our first-person narrator in this book about a pleasant African-American family.

It is satisfying to me to learn that he bears a resemblance to the book’s narrator because though it is a novel, it reads very much like a personal reminiscence.  He does a great job of drawing us into the life of the Watson family – but more on that in the review.

The Watsons Go to Birmingham: 1963 was his first novel – a book that he took time off from work to write, and which he wrote out in longhand at the public library.   And with that began a string of awards.   He won the Newbery Medal for Watsons – not a bad start!  He also wrote Bud, Not Buddy, a story that includes characters modeled off of both of his grandfathers – Earl “Lefty” Lewis, a Negro league baseball pitcher, and 1930s bandleader Herman E. Curtis, Sr., of Herman Curtis and the Dusky Devastators of the Depression.  Bud, Not Buddy was the first novel to receive both the Coretta Scott King Award and the Newbery Medal.  His book Elijah of Buxton, about a free Black community in Ontario that was founded in 1849 by runaway slaves, won the Scott O’Dell Historical Fiction Award, the Coretta Scott King Award and  Newbury Honor.   This year, he came out with a Depression-Era story, The Mighty Miss Malone.

Curtis’ father was a chiropodist and factory worker/supervisor, and his mother an educator.  He attended public schools in Flint, and at McKinley Junior High, he was the first African-American student to be elected to student council.  He later graduated from University of Michigan-Flint, and was the speaker at his own commencement.  As in his life, Flint plays an important role in many of his stories.

After high school, Curtis spent time developing artistic talents, performing with a traveling musical theater group  called Suitcase Theatre, and he also put in a lot of time on a factory assembly line hanging doors on big cars.  Since 1998, however, he has been a full-time author and lecturer, and was also able to strut his stuff as a rapper (stage name L-Toe – couldn’t find any more information on that – but I tried!).

Since 2008, each year Curtis returns to the University of Michigan-Flint to host the Christopher Paul Curtis Writing Challenge, a program instituted by Dr. Rose Casement and Dr. Fred Svoboda.  In this program, every fourth-grade student in Flint comes to UM-Flint’s auditorium to hear a presentation by Curtis, are provided with a story starter that he has written, and are given the challenge of finishing the story.  A winner is chosen from each of the city’s elementary schools, and they attend an ceremony at the university where an overall winner is announced.  The stated goal of the challenge is to expose Flint’s youth to the university environment and to encourage writing as a means of expression.  Sounds like a great creative-writing idea to me!

Christopher Curtis and his wife, Habon live in Detroit with their baby daughter.  Curtis also has two grown children from a previous marriage.

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